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Time for an event sustainability policy?

Greenwashing is a toxic option

Greenwashing, or ‘the green sheen’, is the use of marketing to promote an organisation's products, activities or policies as environmentally friendly when they’re not. Here’s an example. You’ve started your journey towards sustainability. You’ve worked hard to make your event part of that journey, only to discover that the third prize in your virtual, online quiz is a diesel car. Better still, this news has gone viral. And not in good way. If only your team had been guided by a sustainability policy.

There can be little doubt that, in terms of ‘sustainability’, live events can generate significant impacts. Some of these are positive, in terms of generating income, creating positive PR, and raising awareness. Others are negative, such as inevitable energy use, waste generation and carbon emissions.

Of course, steps can be taken to reduce the negative impacts, confound the issues and maximise the positive impacts of the event. The first positive action is to find partners to collaborate with, and to work with us to identify the impacts that your event will have.

Then you’ll need to analyse your brand and its activities, identify its impacts and decide on measures to manage them. This will enable you to write a brief sustainability policy for your event, communicating your sustainability goals to all your stakeholders, including your suppliers, and outlining how you think they can help you improve the sustainability impacts of your event.

JOIN THE DISCUSSION. TAKE A LOOK AT OUR PAPER:

SUSTAINABILITY IN LIVE EVENTS: GOOD FOR PEOPLE, PLANET AND PROFITABILITY’

Christopher Joyce

Christopher Joyce

Christopher Joyce, Copywriter at Shelton Fleming, a creative agency that produces live events which transform how you see the wider-world, business and brands. We do this by designing intelligent, personalized experiences for global brands.

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