Blog

The cult of personality

Competition for the innovation narrative

The meteoric rise of social media, as a ubiquitous phenomenon and a formidable socio-economic force, is unquestioned. On the street, it means that consumers increasingly expect direct relationships with ‘their’ brands. Likewise, in business, it's given the cult of personality an increasingly pervasive role in how markets are defined and brands perceived.

It’s about an appealing and powerful narrative

The type of people now entering the field and disrupting things, are from a different mind-set and often have a more appealing and powerful narrative. A brand like Boeing may be strong but, it’s also faceless in many ways. Now these venerable brands find themselves competing with the cult of personality.

Space is about more than talk

With a vision that spans from electric cars to SpaceX, putting satellites in space more cost effectively, Musk is certainly punching above his weight. But while the champions of the new galaxies, like Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos and even Richard Branson, are past masters in the public relations sphere, can they actually deliver? How much of their campaigning is just that? How much is self-promotion, bluster and bravado? And how much is based on cold, hard ability and the power to perform? One thing’s for sure. When tech luvvies, like Elon Musk, appear with their disruptive ideas and a vision for a better future, it makes life for the venerable incumbents much more challenging. In fact, they make owning the innovation narrative and winning the hearts and minds of audiences a whole lot tougher.

 

For engineering and science brands in the aerospace and smart transport sector, it places the emphasis on communicating with an authentic voice and personalising the customer journey. 

About the author: Andrew Reid is Strategy Director at Shelton Fleming, a creative agency that produces live events which transform how you see the wider-world, business and brands. We do this by designing intelligent, personalized experiences.

Further reading